How To Make A DIY Autumn Leaf Candle Holder

Decoupage Real Leaves on Glass Containers

You will want to find a corner to display these pretty autumn candle holders all year long. But first, let them be the star of your Thanksgiving table. They are really easy to make, and the effect is quite stunning.

Real leaves are decoupaged onto glass containers.  Use Mason jars or purchase inexpensive glass containers.

Be sure to dry the leaves first. Press them between heavy books or newspapers weighted down for at least a week or more depending on how moist they still are when you find them. Then use Modgepodge to apply them to your container.

They look pretty as they are, but I decided to give mine a frosty look with “Pixie Dust”, or iridescent glitter.

 

Here’s what you will need to make a DIY autumn leaf candle holder

  1. Glass container
  2. Pretty autumn leaves, press-dried
  3. Modgepodge
  4. Sponge applicator
  5. Elmer’s clear-drying glue
  6. Iridescent glitter
  7. Small paintbrush

Clean and dry the glass container. Modgepodge the dried leaves on them. Allow to dry. Make a wash of one part water to one part Elbers glue. Working in sections, paint the glue wash over the container and sprinkle with the glitter. Add a candle and light it to watch the frosty leaves sparkle.

Thanksgiving Memory Tablecloth Idea

Start a Thanksgiving Memory Tablecloth

Because of distance or travel time, Thanksgiving may be one of the few times during the year that certain loved ones can get together. Since children,grandchildren, nieces and nephews grow and change each year, this year try starting a Thanksgiving Memory Table Cloth. It is an easy and inexpensive way to create a special family keepsake.

 

Materials for Memory Table Cloth

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1. Purchase an inexpensive linen-type white table cloth

2. Fabric paint in Fall colors

3. Fabric markers

4.Large size artists brushes

Directions

Spread brown fabric paint on child’s palm and thumb with the large artist’s brush. Then carefully paint each of the four fingers a different color such as yellow,orange or green. Have child to carefully press hand palm-down on a prearranged area. Wash hand! Child then uses fabric markers to embellish the “turkey” with eyes, comb and waddle. Maybe even a little Pilgrim’s hat one year to be different. Encourage each child to express their own creativity.

Be sure to have each child use the fabric markers to add their name, date and special yearly message if desired.

Thanksgiving Memory Place Mat

A variation of the Memory Table Cloth is a Thanksgiving Memory Place Mat.Individual children can do hand prints on 11-inch by 14 inch construction paper. Use Tempera or acrylic paint rather than fabric paint. Embellish with fine pointed colored Sharpies brand markers. Cover with clear Con-tact for durability. These would make great gifts for grandparents, aunts and uncles.

Imagine how valuable your Memory Table Cloth or Place Mat will be in years to come!

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Thanksgiving Thematic Unit Ideas Social Studies

Thanksgiving History and Geography.

Thanksgiving is the perfect time to teach elementary kids some American history right along with a good dose of geography. Clever art projects can be incorporated into lessons to help children understand and appreciate our country’s early beginnings.

The Mayflower’s Journey

globe

Thanksgiving is the perfect time to teach the continents and oceans. Use globe and map worksheets to discuss how the Pilgrims left England on the continent of Europe to cross the Atlantic Ocean and settle in a new land in North America.  Learning about the globe is more meaningful when connected to this lesson in history.

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Mayflower Craft Project

This mayflower craft project will inspire learning fun facts about the Mayflower’s journey. According to ability, students can research and list amazing facts or write reports about the journey, like how long it took, what they ate and drank, and more. Need sentences for grammar and mechanics practice? Use the facts as sentences on worksheets.

Materials:

  • brown paper lunch bag
  • straw
  • white paper
  • glue
  • a little play dough

How to make:

Cut a boat shape out of a brown paper bag. Cut so the fold in the bag is on the bottom and it will stand up. Anchor a drinking straw in the middle with a wad of play dough. Cut holes in the white rectangle sails with a hole punch. Thread them onto the straw. Filling the boat with shredded paper bag will fluff it out and help it stand.

Thanksgiving History and Life in the Colonies

Maps of the first colonies help blend geography and history. Students learn the name and location of the 13 original colonies that eventually sprang up thanks to the Pilgrims’ voyage.

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Making a Hornbook

Studying life in the colonies fascinates students. Teach them about the one-room school and how they used hornbooks. Hornbooks were made of wood. They displayed the alphabet, numerals,  and bible verses. Young students wore them around their neck.

Materials:

  • construction paper
  • glue
  • marker
  • hole puncher
  • string

How to make

Cut a hornbook shape from light and dark brown paper. Students use markers to write letters and numbers. Punch a hole in the hornbook’s handle for a string.

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 Thanksgiving History and the Native Americans

Native American tribes are divided into regions. Learning the regions can be incorporated into US map skills. Older students will like doing research to learn the names of the different tribes in each region.

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Thanksgiving History Totem Pole Project

Totem poles are so interesting! They were made by the Pacific Coastal Indians mostly from redwood. They used natural dyes to make paint and painted pictures of animals and nature to tell stories. They were like “books” to these early tribes. Students can construct their own totem poles and write a story about them. Help them look up images of totem poles for ideas.

Materials:

  • empty paper towel roll
  • colored construction paper
  • glue
  • scissors

How to Make:

Cut out shapes from construction paper. Students can use them to make totem pole images. Glue strips of paper around the “totem pole” and then add features. Older or more capable students can cut out their shapes.

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Native American Dreamcatcher Project

Pretty dreamcatchers were fashioned by Native Americans and hung above where they slept. They believed dreams were filtered by the colorful webs and bad dreams were trapped in them. What better way is there than this for inspiration to write about good and bad dreams kids remember. An interesting way to deal with dreams!

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Materials:

  • paper plates
  • craft feathers
  • plastic craft beads
  • skein of multi-colored yard
  • hole puncher

How to Make:

Cut paper plate so it is only a rim. Punch evenly spaced holes in the rim. Students thread the yarn on a bobby pin to act as a needle. They then lace the yarn through. Add a few beads and tie a knot to hold them in place.  Punch a few holes closely together at the bottom. Add strings and use hot glue to glue on craft feathers.

Books For Learning About Early America


Thanksgiving Dip: Edible Centerpiece Idea

Fun Appetizer for Thanksgiving Dinner

Have you ever noticed? Most people have Thanksgiving Dinner at an off-hour from their regular everyday meals. It’s usually somewhere between two and three hours after the usual lunch and two to three hours before the usual dinnertime. 

This idea for a before-dinner appetizer can keep grown-ups from getting cranky and help keep the kiddies happy. And it’s an excellent way to sneak some healthy veggies and fiber into the day. 

Edible Centerpiece Idea

 Create a unique bowl for your dip such as a small hollowed-out pumpkin or acorn squash. 

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You might have to trim off the bottom if using an acorn squash so that it will sit flat.

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Slice the fat end from a large carrot. Par boil to make it soft. Use a toothpick to attach the turkey’s head to the front of the acorn squash. Create features with pimento slices, craisens (eyes) and a slice of yellow pepper for the beak.They can be attached with pieces of broken toothpicks, then trimmed with scissors. Make the feet with yellow peppers. 

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Use slices of squash, colorful peppers and whatever else you can come up with to create your turkey’s feathers.

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Add a layer of round crackers between the body and the feathers. 

A platter of veggies and crackers with toothpicks will keep your turkey centerpiece from getting gobbled up.

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Now search through all of the delicious fall dip ideas or use your old favorite standby to help finish this yummy centerpiece.

Here’s my recipe. 

Spinach-Parmesan Artichoke Dip 

  1. One 10-ounce package frozen spinach, thawed and drained
  2. One 10 oz can artichokes thawed and diced. 
  3. One cup Parmesan cheese, shredded
    1/2 cup light mayo

Mix all ingredients thoroughly. Pour into a pie pan and bake for 20 minutes at 350 degrees

Five Little Turkey Rhymes With Props

Five Little Turkeys Finger Play For Thanksgiving

Make Turkey Puppets

Turn old gray, brown or beige knit gloves into neat Thanksgiving puppets to use as props for Thanksgiving rhymes and finger plays.

Rhymes and finger plays are an integral part of any early childhood program. They help teach language and pre-reading skills Creatively incorporating finger plays into the curriculum can also help teach concepts like counting, number words, addition, subtraction and much more.

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And, they’re just plain fun, especially if you use props for the kids to actively participate dramatically, rather than just holding up fingers. This Thanksgiving, enhance those fun rhymes and finger plays with fun turkey puppets.

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Here’s How

Materials Needed:

  • Old neutral colored knit gloves
  • Orange craft foam
  • Red craft felt
  • Small googly eyes
  • Craft feathers
  • Hot glue

Directions:

  1. Wash and dry knit gloves
  2. Snip off the ends of the four fingers
  3. Insert a colored craft feather into the slot and secure with a dab of hot glue
  4. Cut red felt comb and waddle
  5. Cut orange craft foam triangle for the beak
  6. Glue on features and googly eyes on each side

Some Thanksgiving Rhymes to Use

1.

Five little turkeys standing in a row.

First little turkey said, “I don’t want to grow.”

Second little turkey said, “Why do you say that?”

Third little turkey said, “I want to get fat.”

Fourth little turkey said, “Thanksgiving is near.”

Fifth little turkey said, “Yes, that’s what I hear.”

Then the five little turkeys that were standing in a row,

All said together, “Come on, let’s go!”

2.

Five little turkeys by the front door.

One waddled off, then there were four.

Four little turkeys under the tree.

One waddled off, then there were three.

Three little turkeys had nothing to do.

One waddled off, then there were two.

Two little turkeys, out in the sun.

One waddled off, then there was one.

One little turkey, you better run away

Because soon it will be Thanksgiving Day!

3.

Five Fat Turkeys Sitting on the gate

The first one said, “Oh my, it’s getting late!”

The second one said, “Thanksgiving is near.”

The third one said, “That makes me shake with fear!”

The fourth one said, “Let’s run, run, run!”

The fifth one said, “Here comes the farmer with his gun!”

“Let’s have turkey dinner,” they heard the farmer say.

So the five fat turkeys flew far, far away!

Thanksgiving Activities For Kids: Last Minute Crafts And Snack Ideas.

Easy Thanksgiving Ideas for Kids

Thanksgiving is such a great holiday for teaching  Early American History to kids.They love learning about the First Thanksgiving and all about Pilgrims and Indians.

There are plays, skits, crafts and Thanksgiving dinners for school and daycare groups. Thanksgiving  activities are a big part of American culture.Parents look forward to what the kids made at school or daycare for Thanksgiving. These Thanksgiving activities for kids are easy to do. The materials are minimal and easy to get.This is what makes them so good for last minute crafts and snacks for school, daycare or at home.

Thanksgiving Craft and Snack Ideas

Not only are these last minute snack and craft ideas for Thanksgiving easy to prepare for, they are also multi-leveled.  Use them for preschool Thanksgiving crafts. Older children can create these Thanksgiving crafts with minimal help from adults.

Last minute snack and craft ideas for Thanksgiving are great for home schooling, busy Moms, daycare and busy teachers of younger kids.

Thankful Turkey Feathers

This thankful turkey is made by painting  two Styrofoam balls with brown acrylic paint. One (the head) is smaller than the other (the body). This turkey has googly eyes and a snood and wattle made of a red chenille pipe cleaner. Form an orange beak triangle. Attach the Styrofoam balls together with hot glue and add features.  Attach him to a set of craft foam or heavy cardboard feet.

Child or teacher can cut paper feathers. They can color Popsicle sticks with markers for the feathers to be glued on. The feathers can then be easily stuck into the turkey’s Styrofoam body.

Kids write something to be thankful for on this turkey’s feathers.

This Thanksgiving craft for kids can be used in different ways.

For Younger Kids:

Thankful turkey feathers make a great literacy lesson for little ones. The early childhood teacher will create the turkey craft. She will provide ‘feathers’ for individual kids on which to write things they are thankful for .

 

For Older Kids:

Older kids can be more involved in the creation of the turkey that holds the ‘thankful feathers.’

This is a great craft for kids to take home. Parents will love to use it for a Thanksgiving decoration. Kids will be so proud!

It is also a good group activity for the early childhood classroom.  Use it as a table centerpiece for a parent-child Thanksgiving luncheon.

 

Thanksgiving Snack For Kids

Kids of all ages will like this healthy turkey snack. It is made with the following:

  • A pear sliced vertically
  • Red and yellow apple slices
  • Raisins and craisins
  • Cheddar cheese triangles
  • Halved grapes
A fruity turkey!

 

Slice a pear vertically and place on a plate. Add grape halves and red and yellow apple slices as shown for feathers. This turkey has a craisin snood,  raisin eyes and an apple slice wattle. They are attached with tooth pick halves. Take care when serving young children to remove the tooth picks.

Cheesy beak and feet make this nutritious snack complete.

This is a great snack for those day care programs that are open almost to the last  minute for the holiday.

Indian Corn Napkin Rings

Indian Corn Napkin Rings

Indian corn napkin rings are a great last minute project that will impress parents. Use empty toilet tissue holders and tissue paper in Indian corn colors. They make very nice napkin holders that will really add to the Thanksgiving dinner table.

For Younger Kids:  

Use tissue ‘squares’ that are about 3″x 3″. This is a good activity for fine muscle development. Let the kids ball the squares with their fingers. Help them glue to a half of a toilet tissue roll. They can even practice patterning as a math skill. See how the one roll has a color pattern started. Patterning is an important math skill for young children.

For Older Kids:

Older children have greater fine motor skills and a longer attention span. They can also be directed to cut tissue ‘squares’. Use smaller squares for them.

Harvest Fruit Sun Catchers

Harvest Sun Catchers will be a great decoration for kids to share at home.

 

Parents really love it when kids bring home things for holidays. It is the perfect time to brag. Many times holiday craft projects are kept as memorabilia for many years. This can be difficult for teachers of really young kids with limited skills. Harvest fruit sun catchers involve little ones for a nice looking Thanksgiving craft to send home. Skills for this project vary from easy to harder. Tissue shapes are glued to wax paper fruit cut-outs inside fruit frames of black construction paper. Use a white crayon for tracing fruit shapes.

For Younger Kids:

Prepare materials. Let them glue pre-cut tissue pieces to fruit shapes.

For Older Kids:

Older children can cut and trace their own fruit shapes from patterns. They can also cut the tissue shapes.

Kids trace fruit shapes from black construction paper. Tissue collage makes pretty sun catchers.

Harvest Fruit From Paper Strips

Cute and easy harvest fruit from strips of construction paper.

These apples and pumpkins can fill a basket for a table centerpiece for the day care Thanksgiving dinner. Toss them into a basket with mini pumpkins and gourds. Parents are sure to be impressed.

For Younger Kids

These students can practice cutting skills using safety scissors. Help them adjoin four strips with paper fasteners. Assist with cutting and attaching stems.

For Older Kids

Older kids can follow directions and complete this activity with minimal assistance.

Don’t send the kids home for Thanksgiving this year without a cute Thanksgiving craft that they made in school or daycare !

Fruit Kabob Turkey With Chocolate Dip Body

Fruit Kabob Turkey

Thanksgiving Snacks For Kids

Fruit  kabobs are a fun way for kids to eat fruit.  Fruit is an extremely important part of anyone’s diet but  especially for kids’ diets.  Fruit kabobs make it more likely that kids will eat fruit. Anything that is fun is better!

Kids love food that looks like animals and other objects. Food that looks like other things is a great way to encourage picky eaters. Even kids that don’t really relish fruit will be begging for a “turkey feather”!

Turkey Table Centerpiece

Do you need a centerpiece idea for your Thanksgiving table?  This clever rainbow fruit kabob that looks like a turkey is sure to be a winner.  It is a fun project to do with the kids for Thanksgiving. Getting them involved in preparing a holiday meal is lots of fun and a good way to spend quality time together.

It’s never too soon to help kids become aware of the health benefits of fruit and other healthy foods. Getting them into the habit of eating healthy foods now is a benefit that will pay off for them later in life. Even young children can become aware of how each food helps certain parts of the body.

Use the information after the post  for a quick reference. While making rainbow fruit kabob turkeys, discuss with the kids how each fruit helps us stay healthy.

An Edible Centerpiece

Guests will love this fruit kabob edible centerpiece. An easy-to-make, delicious chocolate fruit dip in a bowl is the turkey’s body.  Dip in some “fruity feathers” for a tasty appetizer. The turkey’s head is a crunchy pear. His beady eyes are blueberries skewered into mini marshmallows with toothpicks.  His beak is an orange wedge, his snood is the pointy end of strawberries and his wattle is a slice of crispy red apple. Attach these parts to the pear with halves of toothpicks. Give the turkey two carrot strip legs and orange wedge feet. He will be almost too cute to eat!

How To Make A Rainbow Fruit Kabob Turkey

Materials And Ingredients:

  • assorted fruit (grapes, kiwi, strawberries, pineapple, cantaloupe)
  • wooden skewers
  • toothpicks
  • one pear
  • two blueberries
  • two mini marshmallows
  • one orange
  • carrot strips
  • one pear
  • endive (optional, for grass)
  • small glass bowl
  • chocolate dip (easy recipe below)
Use 10-12 skewers for the fruit kabobs.

Assembling The  Fruit Kabob Turkey

  1. Skewer three grapes and push to about one inch from the end.
  2. Add pineapple chunks, kiwi and strawberry slices, and cantaloupe chunks.
  3. Top with three grapes in a smaller size for the “feather tips”.
(10-12 skewers of fruit will make a turkey with a full spread of feathers.)

Attach the turkey’s features to the pear with toothpicks.  Now attach the turkey’s head to the bottom of  a skewer of fruit near the middle.

Attach the head to the middle skewer on the make. This skewer will need less fruit.

 

Easy Chocolate Fruit Dip Recipe

This easy recipe uses only three ingredients!

Melt 3/4 cup semisweet chocolate morsels. Mix with a package of softened cream cheese and two cups Cool Whip.

 

Grapes,

  • Antioxidants, copper, iron, manganese, vitamins C & K, carotenes, B-complex,
    • Protects against  certain cancers, fights heart disease and Alzheimer’s later in life.
  • Antioxidants, copper, iron, manganese, vitamins C & K, carotenes, B-complex.
  • Protects against  certain cancers, fights heart disease and Alzheimer’s later in life.

Strawberries

  • Anthocyanis, ellagic acid, quercetin,  vitamin C
  • Helps to have a healthy brain,  reduces forgetfulness, protects against cancer and heart disease.

 Cantaloupe

  • Folate, carotenoids,
  • Helps promote healthy growth and cell maintenance, prevents anemia

Kiwi Fruit

  • Rich in vitamin C, potassium, prebiotics, 
  • Helps muscle contract, prevents “charlie horse”, helps the body fight germs and aids in the digestion of food.

Pineapple

  • Vitamins C & A, calcium, phosphorous, potassium, manganese
  • Helps to have strong bones and healthy gums. Fights off colds and flu,  fights against eye disease when older.