DIY Frosty Paws: Dog Friendly Ice Cream

 

Dog Days of Summer

What comes to your mind when you hear the expressions “dog days of summer” or “dog day afternoon?” I tend to think of an old dog laying out under a shade tree on a hot day. Or maybe that sentence we used to type over and over in typing class: The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dogs. ( It was used for practice because it has one of each of the letters in the alphabet).

In reality, the expression dog days of summer comes from the ancient Romans who associated scorching weather with Sirius, the Dog Star. It’s the brightest star in the constellation Caris Major, or Large Dog. The Greeks had used the term previously.

Originally, those were the days when Sirius rose along with the sun. It was known as a hiliacal rising, which means that a heavenly body becomes visible for a moment or two just before sunrise. Because of the gradual shift in the earth’s axis, this phenomenon doesn’t occur anymore.

Traditionally, the old Farmer’s Almanac listed the last weeks of July and the first weeks of August as “dog days” which coincides with the time of the rising of Sirius in ancient Greek times. These hot, hot days just before an autumn cool-down occur at that time in the Northern hemisphere. In the Southern hemisphere, they come in January and February.

Dog-friendly Ice Cream

Back to the subject of hot dogs, dogs can’t sweat to cool off like we do. They pant. That’s why they walk around most of the summer with their tongues hanging out. Why not help your pooch cool off with a dog-friendly frozen treat?

Most dogs can tolerate the lactose in yogurt. Lactose is milk sugar, and a lot of lactose isn’t good for dogs. Cheese is the dairy product lowest in lactose. That’s why it’s used in many dog treats. Check out the table below to compare the amount of lactose in dairy products.

If you aren’t sure your dog can tolerate a little lactose, start off slowly and watch for signs of lactose intolerance such as vomiting and diarrhea.

Frosty Paws Ice Cream

Back in the 1970s, an animal sciences professor at Ohio State University created what was marketed under the brand name Frosty Paws. The dairy ingredient he used was yogurt. Yogurt is lower in lactose than ice cream or milk. My understanding is that he created it for some sort of challenge or contest.

 

Product
Serving Size
Amount of Lactose in Grams
Ice Cream
1 cup
l2
Milk, whole and skim
1 cup
11
Yogurt
1 cup
5
Sour Cream
1/2 cup
4
Cottage Cheese
1/2 cup
3
Cheese, American and Swiss
1 ounce
1
Cheddar Cheese
1 ounce
0

Yummy dog-friendly ice cream is made with four basic ingredients: plain yogurt, natural peanut butter, bananas and honey. Easy to make, it can be frozen in bathroom-size paper cups and easily removed.

Help your dog stay cool during the dog days of summer!

Make Your Own Frosty Paws

9209012_f260

Yummy dog-friendly ice cream is made with four basic ingredients: plain yogurt, natural peanut butter, bananas and honey. Easy to make, it can be frozen in bathroom-size paper cups and easily removed.

Help your dog stay cool during the dog days of summer!

Ingredients for Doggy Ice Cream

  • One Large ripe banana, mashed
  • One cup Creamy natural peanut butter
  • Two cups Plain yogurt
  • Two tablespoons Honey

Instructions

  • With a potato masher and a fork, mash the banana
  • Put the yogurt in the blender
  • Melt the peanut butter in the microwave for a little under a minute, until soupy
  • Stir the honey into the peanut butter.
  • Add the mashed banana and peanut butter honey mixture to the blender
  • Mix on Milkshake Speed 2-3 minutes until well blended
  • Fill bathroom cups a little less than half full. Freeze 4-6 hours.
Mash one large ripe banana 

9208331_f520

Put the yogurt in a blender

9208334_f520

Microwave peanut butter until soupy

9208340_f520

Stir honey into peanut butter

this

Add banana and peanut butter mixture

this one

Blend on milkshake setting until well blended

 

and here

Pour into bathroom cups and freeze

last

Leave a Reply